Revision Breast Reconstruction Surgery

Whether a breast reconstruction is performed using an implant or the patient's own tissue ("autologous" flap), it usually takes more than one stage for the best results. A second procedure—referred to as the "revision stage" or "stage 2"—is designed to fine-tune the reconstructed breast(s) in order to improve the overall cosmetic appearance. 

Stage 2 breast reconstruction is typically performed about 3 months after the initial reconstruction as a day surgery (outpatient). 

For implant-based reconstructions, stage 2 usually involves exchange of the tissue expander for the permanent implant, and fat grafting to improve the soft tissue contour and "padding" over the implant. Direct-to-implant ("one-stage") reconstructions can also require revision surgery, usually fat grafting. For autologous (flap) breast reconstruction, revision surgery usually involves scar revisions, fat grafting, and shaping of the reconstructed breast(s). 

If the reconstruction was performed as a unilateral (one-sided) procedure, stage 2 usually also involves symmetry surgery on the other breast to match the breasts as closely as possible if this was not performed at the first surgery.

Revision surgery is also an option for patients unhappy with the results of reconstruction performed elsewhere.

The exact details of the revision surgery required will depend on the type of breast reconstruction the patient had initially. 

Learn More
Close
Patient Stories

Carla from San Antonio, Texas,

After discussing all options with her surgeon, Carla chose to reduce her breast size following DIEP flap breast reconstruction. She is thrilled with her results and shares her experience here.

Read Full Story

Shellie from San Antonio, Texas,

Dr. Ochoa said I was a candidate for DIEP flap reconstruction. I wanted it done at the time of the mastectomy. I spent the next month reading everything I could about DIEP flap and early stage cancer and watching the patient testimonials, while getting used to the no caffeine or chocolate before surgery.

Read Full Story

Linda from Rulo, Nebraska,

On September 4, 2012, I underwent the DIEP Flap reconstruction. The results are better than I’d expected. I feel good about myself, especially knowing that it’s all me. No artificial implants. I like to say that PRMA gave me back what Cancer stole from me.

Read Full Story

Jo from San Antonio, Texas,

A week after I turned 41, I want into the hospital for a bilateral mastectomy with lymph node biopsy and reconstruction.

Read Full Story

Patricia from Austin, TX,

I had my bilateral mastectomy and immediate DIEP flap the day before my birthday in September of 2010. I told the hospital staff that this was my birthday present; getting rid of cancer, getting a breast reduction and getting a tummy tuck. I thought I would be terrified, but everyone had told me how great Dr. Ledoux was and how wonderful the hospital staff was, so after Dr. Ledoux prayed with me, I was ready to go.

Read Full Story

Anna from San Antonio, Texas,

To those of you who may be reading these stories and facing the same diagnosis as I and other women on this page have confronted, have faith in God’s healing powers through the work of His faithful servants like Dr. Ledoux.

Read Full Story

Misty from Eugene, Oregon,

I think for anyone considering this surgery, you have to feel good about your doctor and confident in their abilities. Complications happen, even with the best of doctors, but doing your research and knowing how often your doctor does DIEP flap reconstruction, what their failure rates are, what kinds of complications they typically see, how long they expect your surgery to be, what the backup plan is in case of a failed reconstruction etc. are really important details. I made my choice in doctors based on the answers I received to all my questions, and how comfortable I felt in person with my doctor. I knew immediately after meeting him the first time that it was the right choice for me.

Read Full Story

Shellie from San Antonio, Texas,

PRMA was highly recommended by many, and after meeting with my surgeon, we called PRMA to set an appointment. Dr. Ochoa said I was a candidate for DIEP flap reconstruction. I wanted it done at the time of the mastectomy. I spent the next month reading everything I could about DIEP flap and early stage cancer and watching the patient testimonials, while getting used to the no caffeine or chocolate before surgery.

Read Full Story

Revision Breast Reconstruction Surgery

Whether a breast reconstruction is performed using an implant or the patient's own tissue ("autologous" flap), it usually takes more than one stage for the best results. A second procedure—referred to as the "revision stage" or "stage 2"—is designed to fine-tune the reconstructed breast(s) in order to improve the overall cosmetic appearance. 

Stage 2 breast reconstruction is typically performed about 3 months after the initial reconstruction as a day surgery (outpatient). 

For implant-based reconstructions, stage 2 usually involves exchange of the tissue expander for the permanent implant, and fat grafting to improve the soft tissue contour and "padding" over the implant. Direct-to-implant ("one-stage") reconstructions can also require revision surgery, usually fat grafting. For autologous (flap) breast reconstruction, revision surgery usually involves scar revisions, fat grafting, and shaping of the reconstructed breast(s). 

If the reconstruction was performed as a unilateral (one-sided) procedure, stage 2 usually also involves symmetry surgery on the other breast to match the breasts as closely as possible if this was not performed at the first surgery.

Revision surgery is also an option for patients unhappy with the results of reconstruction performed elsewhere.

The exact details of the revision surgery required will depend on the type of breast reconstruction the patient had initially. 

Learn More
PRMA Plastic Surgery