PRMA and UTHSCSA Join Together to Find Answers

By: Courtney Floyd

Blogs
October 23, 2014

We are conducting a research study involving women with a family history of breast cancer. The goal of the research study is to improve the lives of women with inherited susceptibility to breast cancer through greater understanding and knowledge of what causes this increased risk of breast cancer. Our research is a scientific collaboration between us and the Cancer Therapy and Research Center (CTRC) at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHCSCA).

Women asked to participate in this study are those who may have genetic alterations in certain genes that increase the risk of developing breast cancer, such as the BRCA-1 or PALPB-2 genes and have decided to have a prophylactic mastectomy.

If you decide to participate in this research study, your tissue removed during your mastectomy will be taken to a lab and grown under various conditions. We will study and compare the molecular and cellular characteristics of your tissue to that of tissue without gene abnormalities. In this way, we hope to better understand how these genes work and what the functional consequences are when they carry genetic alterations. Through these efforts, we hope to answer the following questions:

  • Why is breast cancer more common in women with these gene alterations?
  • Why is the increase in cancer risk confined to the breast and ovary, but not other parts of the body?
  • Are there ways to predict who will develop cancer and who will not?
  • Are there medications or other strategies to prevent breast cancer in women with these gene alterations?
  • Can we develop more effective treatments targeted to this particular type of breast cancer?

If you are interested in learning more about the study, please let one of your PRMA providers know and they will guide you through the next steps. A member of our team will speak with you individually, describe it more fully, and answer any questions you may have.

Being a part of this study does not affect your care. There are no extra visits, tests, or costs. We are simply asking your permission to use your breast tissue that would normally be discarded at the time of your surgery for scientific research. If you decide to become a participant, you will be asked to sign a consent form before surgery. This will be done at the hospital immediately before your surgery.  

Learn More About Prophylactic Surgery

6 Comments

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  • Christy

    My grandmother and mother both have had and currently have breast cancer. I am very interested in your research study. I am very worried and concerned that I will get it and would like to take every safe guard not to get it. Can you please contact me in regards to the research study.

    Reply
  • PRMA Plastic Surgery

    Hey Christy! I would love to send you more information on our research study! I will email you today!

    Reply
  • Linda

    I am 53 and had a bilateral prophylactic mastectomy based upon a strong family history of breast cancer (negative BRCA1 and 2) after the discovery of three large tumors positive for Atypical Ductal Hyperplasia. I did consult with a genetic specialist prior to deciding to move forward with the mastectomy. I had immediate reconstruction with Mentor cohesive gel implants which had to be removed due to progressive illness after about 6 years. Would I be of help in your study?

    Reply
  • PRMA Plastic Surgery

    Thank you so much for your interest Linda! Unfortunately, because you have already had your breast tissue removed, you would not be eligible. I truly appreciate your interest and wish you all the best!

    Reply
  • Lori

    I am scheduled for a mastectomy/reconstruction this coming week to be done by PRMA. I had genetic testing but did not have the BRCA genes, although I had a gene for colon cancer with ovarian and breast cancer as secondary. If this test is still going on would they be interested in my tissue?

    Reply
  • PRMA Plastic Surgery

    Absolutely Lori! Just let your surgeon know the morning of surgery and I will make sure the consent form is at the hospital for you to sign the morning of surgery. Thanks so much!

    Reply
PRMA Plastic Surgery